Tag Archives: KUCB

The Alaska Fisheries Report

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Coming up this week, the Coast Guard gets busy as soon as the crab season begins, we hear how one CDQ group is doing, and maybe limitless power for False Pass to process fish and light up the town. We had help this week from KDLG’s Mike Mason in Dillingham and KUCB’s Lauren Rosenthal in Unalaska.

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Akutan and False Pass Without VPSOs

Lauren Rosenthal/KUCB
As of today, two Aleutian communities are lacking local law enforcement. The village public safety officer in Akutan has resigned for personal reasons. And False Pass lost its VPSO two months ago, when the officer moved back to the East Coast to be near family.
Both were employed by the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, or APIA. They get funding from the state of Alaska to put officers in five communities.
But keeping them is a challenge. APIA’s public safety coordinator Michael Nemeth [KNEE-mith] says most VPSOs don’t stay in the Aleutians and Pribilofs for more than a few years. Hiring from within the region might help with that, but Nemeth says it’s tough to pull off.
Without an officer on the ground, Akutan and False Pass will be relying on the Alaska State Troopers. And Nemeth says he could always quote-”saddle up” himself. He’s a certified VPSO with experience in Nelson Lagoon and St. George.

The Alaska Fisheries Report

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Coming up this week, a Haines fisherman is safe after is boat sinks out from under him; a mixed decision in an Unalaska murder trial, and Western Alaska Natives ask for increased bycatch reduction. All that, and learning to love salmon caviar, coming up on the Alaska Fisheries Report. We had help from KHNS’ Margaret Friedenauer in Haines, KTOO’s Matt Miller in Juneau, KUCB’s Annie Ropeike and Lauren Rosenthal in Unalaska, KYUK’s Daysha Eaton in Bethel and KCAW’s caviar-loving Rich McClear in Sitka.

Cutter Alex Haley Rescues Injured Mariner

Annie Ropeik/KUCB
A Coast Guard crew medevacked a mariner with an injured hand off a freighter south of Unalaska yesterday (Wednesday).
The cutter Alex Haley responded to the request from the 738-foot Lowlands Maine. The Panama-flagged vessel that was on its way from China to the Seattle area.
A 55-year-old crewman on the ship had hurt his hand in the engine room and needed medical treatment, according to a Coast Guard press release.
The Lowlands Maine called the Coast Guard for help Tuesday, and met up with the Alex Haley 115 miles south of Unalaska Wednesday. The cutter’s MH-65 Dolphin helicopter airlifted the injured man off the freighter and took him back to Unalaska for treatment.
The Alex Haley is stationed in Kodiak. The cutter was in Unalaska this week for an annual test of the city’s emergency towing system.

Aleutian Shipping Safety Recommendations Released

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Annie Ropeik/KUCB
For years, shipping safety advocates have called for better protections against oil spills in the Aleutian chain. Now, the plan for a new response system is finally finished. The Aleutian Islands Risk Assessment’s draft report recommends some familiar solutions in new places – all at a cost of almost $14 million a year. KUCB’s Annie Ropeik reports

The Alaska Fisheries Report

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A Siberian Taimen, also known as a Mongolian Terror Trout, can live over 50 years, grow to 230 pounds, and reach 7-feet long. National Geographic photo

The Siberian Taimen, a freshwater salmon also known as a Mongolian Terror Trout, can live over 50 years, grow to 230 pounds, and reach 7-feet long. National Geographic photo

Coming up this week, federal disaster funds are starting to come available for those affected by the king salmon collapse; a third cannery worker has been charged with pollution in Unalaska, and did you know that there’s a Siberian freshwater salmon that can reach seven-feet long? Yeah. We’re going to need a bigger boat. All that and more amazing facts coming up on the Alaska Fisheries Report. We had help from KUCB’s Lauren Rosenthal in Unalaska and KCAW’s Robert Woolsey in Sitka.